Get Blog Updates

Connect With Us

facebook Twitter linkedin RSS

Write for the ATP Blog

Guest Author

 

Training

A Training Session for Healthcare Professionals
Flagstaff Medical Center - Friday, Nov. 3, 2017
9 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.

 The Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) and the Southwest Telehealth Resource Center (SWTRC) are offering “Advances in Telemedicine and Telehealth,” a full-day training for healthcare providers and administrators, Nov. 3, at the Flagstaff Medical Center’s McGee Auditorium.

Experts from around Arizona will share their experiences in delivering a variety of telehealth and telemedicine programs to rural communities throughout the state.

“We are proud that Arizona is a national leader in telemedicine,” said Ronald S. Weinstein, MD, founding director of the ATP. “This training program features leaders in Arizona who are taking center stage in telemedicine nationally.”

Simulation actor Brendan Guy Murphy and UA College of Nursing faculty member Sheri Carson participate in a telehealth simulation

The University of Arizona College of Nursing has launched a telehealth training program for Doctor of Nursing Practice students, likely making it the first nursing school in the country to add the training to its curriculum.

The project is funded with a $26,000 grant from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Graduate Nursing Education Demonstration, which funds hospital-affiliated nursing schools to develop new approaches to nursing practice.

Members of the Utah coalition with Dr. Weinstein and some of the ATP Training staff after their day of training.

It’s at least a 12-hour drive from Salt Lake City, Utah, to the Arizona-Mexico border city of Nogales. But for community health workers in both of those cities, the distance has become much shorter, thanks in large part to the Arizona Telemedicine Program.

Salt Lake City is home to the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute – a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center – as well as the recently formed Community Health Worker Coalition of Utah, a project of the Utah Department of Health. The coalition is made up of about 30 organizations, including Huntsman Cancer Institute.

Panel discussion (l to r) Gigi Sorenson, Dr. Bart Demaerschalk, Dr. Sara Gibson, Dr. Robert Groves, Dr. Jeff Lisse, with Dr. Ronald Weinstein moderating the session.

Did you know that telestroke isn’t solely about determining whether a patient is having an ischemic stroke and needs a clot-busting drug? Or that telepsychiatrists feel that establishing a doctor-patient relationship via telemedicine (never meeting their patients in person) works well? Or that Arizona law requires informed consent before a patient can receive healthcare services through telemedicine?

These are just a few things participants learned at the daylong “Arizona Telemedicine Course: Applications, Model Programs, and Secrets for Success,” held October 9, 2015 at Flagstaff Medical Center.

Doctors watching distance learning presentation

The Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) is known for improving health care in rural communities, saving lives and lowering costs. It’s also known as a leader in distance learning and continuing education programs, developed to meet the needs of patients, physicians and other health professionals.

Educational events such as medical grand rounds are attended “virtually” by physicians, nurses, dentists, therapists, emergency personnel, and other health professionals located throughout Arizona, via videoconferencing or live web streaming. Events offering continuing medical education (CME) credit for physicians and continuing education (CE) credit for nurses are both available. Thirty percent of participants who have attended virtually have received continuing education credits totaling more than 13,000 credit hours since 2000.

Pages


All site content © 1996 - 2017 Arizona Telemedine Program. The University of Arizona is an EEO/AA - M/W/D/V